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of nuclear energy here in the u.s., we continue our coverage of japan's massive earthquake. you're watching "nightly business report" for monday, march 14. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. my colleague tom hudson is off tonight. it's day four of japan's monstrous earthquake and tsunami, and the full brunt of the damage is still unknown. the death toll is expected to exceed 10,000 and the country continues to battle the threat of a catastrophic nuclear accident. now japan is focused on the enormous human suffering, but attention around the world is also shifting to the economic consequences of the disaster. many economists believe the country is likely to slide into recession. so what will that mean for the rest of the world? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: there's no question the human toll of japan's epic earthquake and tsunam
>>> welcome to nhk news world line. the u.s. embassy announced the head of japan affairs at the state department kevin maher has been fired. visiting u.s. assistant secretary of state kurt campbell, in facted him of the move on thursday in their talks on thursday. they say a former deputy chief will assume the post. maher reportedly told some college students in the u.s. last december that okinawans are masters of manipulation and extortion. he was referring to the relocation of a u.s. marines air space station in the southern most prefecture. in the talks with takeaki matsumoto, campbell said maher's comments are unacceptable and contrary to u.s. policy and its respect for the people of okinawa. >>> japan's two major stock exchange operators will explore the possibility of consolidating their businesses. the talks will be aimed at bolstering japan's standing in the world equity market, amid growing pressure for realignment in the industry. if they agree to integrate operations it will have a listing of 4,000 stocks, rivaling the world's leading forces. the two will likel
is on the way from the u.s. and other countries. with so many roads damaged, the challenge will be getting all of that aid to the people who need it. more than 200 aftershocks have jolted japan since the quake hit, and some of them quite powerful. several happened near a nuclear plant where one reactor has been overheating since friday's earthquake. >> officials say an explosion there involved an outer building, not any of the reactors. people living within 12 miles of the plant have been told to evacuate. before nightfall, more than 3,000 people were rescued across the country. the death toll has topped 900. and officials now fear it could grow higher. we're getting new video in from japan and it really is something to watch. take a look. >> ireporter aaron sent this to us. he was attending a college graduation at a theater in tokyo when the earthquake hit. the theater roof collapsed, but aaron and many others were able to get out, and we hope to talk to aaron lace live as soon as we're able to get a connection with him. so stay with us for his story to match some of those remarkable images.
captioning sponsored by wpbt . >> disasters like this remind us of the common humanity we share. >> president obama works to ease fears at home saying the u.s. is not at risk from the radiation. >> susie: japan's disaster is raising questions about u.s. nuclear liability and the yen's continued surge as we continue our coverage of the japanese crisis. you're watching nightly business report for thursday, march 17th. >> this is nightly business this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> tom: good evening, thanks for joining us tonight. president obama said today japan's nuclear crisis won't affect the united states, susie. >> susie: you know, tom, the president spoke this afternoon from the white house rose garden and said he doesn't expect a nuclear radiation to be a risk for people inside the united states. >> i want to be very clear. we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states
nuclear plant used water cannons, heavy duty fire hoses, and military helicopters in an effort to cool down overheating fuel rods, but it's not clear that anything has worked. president obama said today there was no risk to any u.s. territory from the reactors. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the containment operations, the ongoing exodus of people from areas close to the reactors, and new footage from when the tsunami struck six days ago. >> woodruff: and amid signs of both resilience and confusion, we look at japan's political culture in response to the disaster. >> brown: then, ray suarez has an update on libya, as the u.n. moves to a vote on establishing a no-fly zone over the country. >> woodruff: margaret warner talks to irish prime minister enda kenny about the celtic tiger's struggle to kick-start it's economy. >> brown: and tom bearden reports on a project to use private satellites to help stop genocide. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has be
and they have it under control. in the meantime, we have the former u.s. ambassa doron japan. >> from our perspective. japan is a close friend and alley but a buyer of our treasury note bonds. we have 38,000 military personnel and 48,000 family members and 5,000 civilian department employees. >> there are more americans stationed in japan than anywhere else in the world. we have a huge american presence there. we have a lot of assets there that can be brought to bear in this tragedy that can be helpful. >> apparently they are taking us up on it. the criticism, whether out of japanese pride. but this time they are taking up the help. >> we had the same problem with katrina. they don't expect to be on the other end of it . when they are on the other upon end, sometimes there is friction. we exercise together for this eventuality . when i was in tokyo. they are still doing those exercises. civilian and military components there in japan. you are seeing the result of that practice and experience of the situation. >> you know the country well and tokyo is not earthquake proof but it is earthqu
in the u.s. >> the last 50 workers fled the nuclear plant to escape a huge burst of radiation. >> they have to continue to try. >> officials say 70% of the fuel rods are damaged. 107 miles away in tokyo, residents are leaving despite the surge is that radiation levels are not yet harmful. >> low levels now but we do not know what it will be like tomorrow. is back upnikkei today. >> uncertainty has taken over the markets right now. >> , response the nuclear regulatory commission to explain if our nuclear plants could withstand a 9.0 earthquake. >> we have to make sure that all the bad actors in the industry are sorted out very quickly. >> the government continues to assure americans that radiation levels here are safe. but that has not stopped their run of potassium iodide. one retailer says he has a backlog of 3000 orders. tracie potts, wbal-tv 11 news. >> many of us in the u.s. are remembering the incident that took place at three mile island. the power plant had a malfunction in 1979. the plant had a partial core meltdown. gas was released into the atmosphere. 150,000 people were evacuate
, the latest, one person dead and dozens injured. the mayor standing by to join us live. new radiation fears in tokyo. stocking up on bottles of water after the japanese government warns that tap water is no longer safe for infants, i'm wolf blitzer, you're in the "situation room." in a span of 24 hours, the u.s. military said the coalition launched more than 50 strikes in the mission to protect libyan civilians. but no indication the battle is being over. just a short while ago the secretary of state warned gadhafi the quickest way to end it is for him to leave.<[kyk: . we2íor certainly encouraged the would make a right decision. not only institute a real co comprehensive cease-fire but withdraw from the cities and military abs and prepare for a transition that does not incl e include. >> there are serious reports of major clashes under way. what do we know about the fighting at this moment. >> you just heard secretary of state hillary clinton encouraging momammar gadhafi bu he's not backing down. a couple of major developments that shows that this conflict is far from over. anded stage i
for joining us on a thursday morning. i am alison starling. >> good morning. iambs and a simpson. traffic and weather every ten minutes first. first, meteorologist steve rudin. >> good morning. rumbles of thunder during the early morning. just a few lingering showers for the rush hour as well as patchy fog. the 43 degrees at dulles, 44 at winchester 43 in cumberland, 54 in petersburg. temperatures will remain below average the next several days. the moisture is moving off the coast. there's one more batch of rain to the west of us and it could send all little sleet to the north of us. a few more rainshowers to go just enough to keep the pavement wet. highs today in the mid to upper 40's. sunshine this afternoon. >>>. accident >. -- accident in maryland. it is the ramp from the inner for overnight employees to be allowed to take scheduled m -- scheduled naps. >>> this morning in the bill workers were hurt after they were exposed to a dangerously high levels of radiation in japan and were sent to the hospital for treatment. parents in tokyo stocking up on bottled water. tap water is contami
the middle east. revolution spreads and continues to spread through the middle east. that's all for us tonight. >>> a very warm welcome to "world business today." i'm pauline chiou at cnn hong kong. >> the top stories on this wednesday, march 23rd. >> the libyans will defeat them. >> gadhafi stands firm. >> there's more belt tightening in britain today to try to plug a gaping hole in the country's public finances. >>> and it was once the engine of america. we bring you the startling new figures on detroit's mass population exodus. before all of that, we want to update you on the situation now in japan. black smoke has been seen rising out of the fukushima daichi plant number three reactor building. this is the reactor that has been giving crew there's some trouble the past couple of days. tokyo electric power company says some workers have been evacuated from the plant. we will have more on that from tokyo a bit later on in the show. nina? >> pauline, let's turn our attention towards libya, where coalition bombs and missiles continue to rain down. aircraft like this u.s. marine corps h
. president obama said the u.s. and the world must be ready to act rapidly if the crisis in libya deteriorates. and he didn't rule out the use of a no-fly zone over the country. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we get the latest on the fierce fighting in the oil city of brega and the exodus of refugees fleeing the violence. >> woodruff: plus, we talk to libya's ambassador to the united states, ali suleiman aujali who denounced moammar qaddafi last week. >> brown: then, as states battle public sector unions, we have a newsmaker interview with afl-cio chief, richard trumka. >> woodruff: spencer michels reports on the outcry over hikes in insurance premiums in california. >> the new higher health insurance rates for individuals have sparked protests and calls for the government to step in. >> brown: and hari sreenivasan examines mexico's deadly drug wars, as president felipe calderon visits the white house. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds grea
. breaking news tonight. thanks for inviting us into your home, fair, balanced, and unafraid. >> shepard: continuing coverage of breaking news from libya as muammar qaddafi branches brand new attacks and the united nations takes brand new action. and here in japan the desperate effort to cool the nuclear contractor. an extension cord more than half a mile long could provide the best chance yet of prevent ago nuclear breakdown. this is breaking news now on fox news channel, i'm shepard smith. the news starts now. >> shepard: they are attacking the problem from the air and the ground. part of the effort to cool down those fuel rods and reactors. >> even as japanese responders continue to do heroic work, we know that the damage to the nuclear reactors poses a substantial risk. >> shepard: and officials say what happens in the hours ahead is absolutely critical. plus, a new move to pull americans out of the danger zone. >> i'm concerned because i really don't know the situation about the radiation. >> shepard: tonight, the escape from japan. and good friday morning from tokyo where there is
approved the bill last week. that brings us to our water cooler question of the day. what do you think of the latest delay in the vote on the same- sex marriage bill? you can share your response at wbaltv.com and on our facebook page, or send us an e-mail to watercooler@wbaltv.com. >> dozens of truckers expressing their anger over a possible fuel tank increase. lawmakers are considering raising vehicle registration fees. some fear a higher fuel tax will force drivers to fill up in other states. the plan was stop funding for a program that compensates school districts. it is estimated it would save nearly $12 million. it is the cost of doing business. $4 billion in cuts. >> house lawmakers avoided a temporary shutdown. kate amara is in washington with more. >> good morning. the senate is scheduled to vote on the measure this morning and it is expected to pass. shut down averted, for now. house lawmakers buying time in the budget process despite approval of an emergency spending bill to keep the government running. republicans say the measure is just the beginning. >> the american people
. here's a look 694 west of per ring parkway. for more, you can count on us the wjz.com. >>> here's what people will be talking about today. a race against the clock is continuing in japan as the damaged nuclear reactors continue to heat up. the u.s. is ordering people who live within 50 miles of the plant to evacuate or stay indoors, twice the dangerous zone reported by the japanese. here's charlie d'agata. >> reporter: military helicopters launched an all out water assault pan japan's crippled nuclear power plant. crews are racing to finish a new power line that could restore crucial water pumps, the best option to cool dangerously hot reactors and prevent a nuclear meltdown. >> my confidence is eroded because of this continual almost daily degradation of the structure they have there. >> reporter: the facility has been plagued by a series of explosions and fires sense last week's earthquake and tsunami knocked out power. newly released images shows the damage to reactor four. japan is denying u.s. claims that same reactor has no more water in the spent fuel pools, meaning there's noth
. the airport will use tanker trucks to refuel planes today. >>> for a fifth straight day, coalition warplanes bombed military targets around libya's capital today. state tv showed what it said was a military base in flames. coalition air strikes on gadhafi forces outside misrata haven't stopped the shelling of those cities. >>> in yemen, a president under fire puts his supporters on the streets in a noisy demonstration. president salah is under intense pressure to step down immediately, but he is refusing. several of salah's key generals and diplomats switched sides after he launched a bloody crackdown last week. >>> in japan, levels of radioactive iodine in tokyo's water system, they dropped significantly today. officials say it is now safe for babies to drink tap water or for parents who use tap water in formula. but still the city handed out about a quarter million bottles of water today to homes with kids. >>> two fukushima nuclear workers are now in the hospital today for possible radiation poisoning. the men stepped in a puddle while laying cable at the plant. water seeped through the p
with u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice. >> brown: then, we get the latest on the radiation containment efforts in japan as the government there raises the alert level. >> suarez: plus jeffrey kaye, in beijing, has chinese reaction to the japanese nuclear crisis. >> the nation is in the process of building 37 new nuclear pourpts, and is now reexamining safety. >> brown: mars and david brooks provide their weekly analysis. >> suarez: and fred de sam lazaro gets a rare look inside syria, where the government is just beginning to be challenged by protesters. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's going to work an a big scale. only, i think it's going to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to ma
-hour war room at their headquarters operation center in rockville, maryland. the u.s. has sent more personnel to help the japan response overall than any other country, so far it's 148 >>> good evening, americans. welcome to "the ed show" tonight from new york. our lead story tonight a live report coming up from japan in just a moment. the unfolding disaster there and coming up the battle ground that must not be ignored right here in the united states. if you thought governor scott walker of wisconsin was bad, wait until you see what governor john kasich of ohio is doing when it comes to picking up where walker left off. with a budget that would cut funds to schools. here's a new one for you. and even children's hospitals. how nice of them. the second front of the war on the middle class well under way. plus the very latest from wisconsin. >>> it's wednesday morning in japan and the brave souls of that country are trying to prevent the world's worst serious nuclear accident since chernobyl from becoming even a bigger disaster. at this hour the numbers are staggering. the number of c
stan grant has been monitoring the rapidly changing developments at the fukushima plants. he joins us live from the tokyo bureau. what's the latest? this is a fast-changing picture, isn't it? >> reporter: it certainly is. what i want to bring you, first of all, is this address to the people by the emperor. this is an extraordinarily rare event. and this was a taped video message played across television networks where he talked about how he cares for the people. the people need to support -- saying the people of japan together can rebuild an even stronger country. separate from the actual taped video message, he also sent a message to the television that we're expecting -- brought to the people, of course. >> stan grant there joining us from tokyo. andrew? >>> well, obviously some very windy times there up in tokyo at the moment, which could be good or bad for the residents of tokyo. radiation levels in the city already certainly higher than normal. >>> also in tokyo today, some good news finally in the financial markets. after two days of major losses on the tokyo stock exchange, tod
in the opening minutes of the day as the u.s. stock market reacts to the nuclear crisis. >>> i'm tamron hall. the "news nation" is following the latest on the nuclear emergency in japan where it is 3:00 a.m. local time. threat level is now being called a six out of seven by the french authority of nuclear safety. a watchdog group that monitors radiation safety. chernobyl, for some perspective here, was six out of serve. three mile island was rated a five. latest explosion in unit two of the fukushima plant may be the worst yet. international atomic energy agency says there's evidence it breached the primary containment shell. that means more radiation could be leaking from that unit. the iaea says radiation levels at site have been decreasing. people living within 20 kilometers of the plant have been evacuated and are lining up to be scanned for radiation. a no-fly zone has been established around the crippled nuclear plant for 30 kilometers. global economic fears, the stock market plummeted today because of the nuclear concerns and right now the dow, let's take a look at it, is down 178 poi
libya and authorization to use "all necessary measures." this is muammar gaddafi vowing to retake the rebel held city of benghazi, offering amnesty to those who surrender and no mercy to others. only hours after he warned foreign powers that any outside attack would trigger retaliation and destabilization of the region. but first, we turn to japan. where emergency workers are feverishly trying to cool down overheating fuel rods at the earthquake and tsunami-stricken nuclear plant. a u.n. nuclear official says the situation is "very serious." but appears to be stable. for now. the u.s. authorized the first evacuations of americans out of japan and president obama says he has asked for a comprehensive review of u.s. nuclear plant safety. correspondent greg palkot is in japan with the latest. >> reporter: there were desperate measures thursday in the fukushima nuclear plant in northeastern japan. helicopters doused water on overheating reactors to avoid a catastrophic core meltdown. the facility was sprayed down with more water from fire trucks. while authorities say there is some st
, david muir, back with us. >> always great to be by your side especially on a morning of breaking news. >> you were reporting this on "world news" last night. more missile strikes for the u.s. and allies against libya. now there is growing concern over how gadhafi will respond and whether he'll make good on his threat of terrorism. >>> and the latest from japan this morning. officials there saying the death toll now tops 18,000 this morning. an incredible number. and new concerns about radiation. contaminating, not only the tap water, but the vegetables there and seafood. we'll have a live report from the quake zone. >>> and in this country, a spring roared in california. snow, ice, rock slides shutting down major highways this morning. sam is standing by with the very latest on that. >> the first full day of spring, david. >>> let's get right to libya. and the latest actions by the u.s. and its allies. french fighter jets for the third day in a row, headed to libya. we have a team of correspondents, covering all of the angles this morning, starting with martha raddatz, in washington w
. >> reporter: the top u.s. energy official meanwhile, steven shoe, expressed frustration with the information coming from japanese officials. >> events unfeeling in japan incident appears to be more serious than three-mile island. to what extent, we don't know now and as they're unfolding rapidly on an hour-by-hour, day- by-day basis and there are conflicting reports, so we don't know what is happening. >> reporter: at the white house, questions surveyed about the japanese government's honesty in dealing with the crisis and who americans should listen to. >> when there is a situation when our advice on what to do in reaction to this incident to protect your physical safety, if first from the advice the government of japan is giving, we'll give separate and additional advice to american citizens in japan. >> reporter: millions are struggling still with no electricity, little food, water or heat and in frigid temperatures, rescuers are trying to find survivors five days later, followed by a tsunamina thaswallowed entire towns, survivors are being found. >> chances of survival are small but we'r
, everybody, and thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. this morning, the situation at japan's crippled fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant has gone from critical to desperate. the plant has suffered severe damage and so far, efforts to gain control have failed. here's the latest. a surge in radiation levels forced the remaining workers at the plant to temporarily withdraw. early this morning, a second fire broke out at reactor number four. this one may involve the outer shell of the containment building. and japanese officials also say the outer containment building of another reactor may have been compromised. charlie d'agata is in takasaki japan with more this morning. he joins us. good morning, charlie, what's the latest there? >> good morning to you, betty. the latest is, thankfully, the fire is out, and the plant's operators said they've been able to stabilize the temperature and the pressure in that critical unit. the reactor has gone -- at the same time the japanese government said it's now time to ask the military for help. efforts to prevent a full-blown nuclear disaster suf
use your card and save on practically the whole aisle. i'm saving money at the register, and that really works for me. more savings every time you shop with your giant card. >>> a operate ti mild day to start. it's kristy in for traffic. marty is in for first warning weather. >> a little bit of dense fog trying to form. let's take a look at the day part. it's going to be a very dry day start. however, what we're going to see after a lunchtime 56 degrees is a pretty good amount of clouds and showers by the late afternoon. moisture is trying to stream our way. there's a stationary front out to the west. it's a matter of time before this shifts in an easterly direction, comes into our neighborhood. i'll tell you about the sunset. that's going to linger on through the night and into tomorrow but not before then. take it away. >> if you're about to join the team of morning traffic, here's kristy breslin in wjz traffic control. >>> 195 will take you a few minutes. easy drive in the northbound direction. southbound some brake lights as you make your way to whitemarsh boulevard.
>>> breaking news this thursday morning. >> getting out. overnight, the u.s. government announces plans to airlift americans from danger. >> it's because of the critical situation at the devastated nuclear plant. workers on a race against time before radiation spreads. but one expert tells abc news, it's almost too late. >>> and good morning, everyone. i'm mike marusarz, in for rob nelson. >> and i'm peggy bunker. despite little radiation risk in most of japan, this morning, there's a race to leave the country. >> for the first time, the u.s. has authorized the evacuation of family members of american diplomats. charter planes are being used to fly americans away from danger. >> and the u.s. is pressuring japan to step up its efforts to avert a nuclear meltdown. they dropped sea water on the crippled reactors today. a heroic step, since the pilots are risking their lives to complete that mission. >> and the tokyo stock market, dropping once again. >>> it was a night of high-level phone calls over the nuclear crisis, as president obama spoke to the japanese prime minister. >> while
country was right there with us, and all the wars we've had. is it better to do it peacefully? absolutely. >> you're a national guardsman. >> i'm a lieutenant colonel, 31 years. i'm a cog in the wheel and go where i'm told. >> you must talk to lots of guys while you're serving. >> i obviously participate in all the briefings. i've been to afghanistan. >> do many of them think the war in iraq was a good idea? >> in iraq? yes. absolutely. it's easier to try to figure out what would have been or could have been. but the fact that we did make the decision, your country and our country should be proud as to what our men and women did. >> it's been fascinating talking to you. >> that's it? >> that's it. you can come back when you're ready to announce you're running for president. how about that? >> okay, whatever. good to meet you. >> my pleasure. that's it for tonight. here's anderson cooper with "ac 360." >> piers, thank you very much. good evening, everyone. we begin tonight with breaking news. a new report tonight that libyan opposition leaders may ask for air strikes under u.n. security co
-union sentiment across the country. fox 5's stacey cohan takes us there. >> the protesters are running wild. >> reporter: this is where it all started to go wrong or to go right depending on who you ask. hundreds of union workers from our city plus activist groups like moveon.org stormed the downtown building that was hosting a fundraiser for republicans. moments before protesters took over the president of the lobbying firm hosting the event told fox news this is a regular event held for wisconsin politicians. >> there is no doubt politics in this country and wisconsin have certainly changed in the last year. two years ago we had this event we'd have 15 people. >> reporter: a few more than 15 showed up this time. protesters swarmed the streets around 12th and f northwest. metropolitan police circled and for a time the situation grew tense. then the group began marching in the streets blocking traffic as they made their way to the white house. >> i am a union member! i am a woman! i am a worker! i am a democrat! i care about this country! >> reporter: the crowd was closely followed by mpd a
of the american f-15 that crash landed. the two-man crew ejected. u.s. officials say they are fine. >> one crew member was recovered by coalition forces and the other crew member was recovered by the people of libya. >> the landed in eastern libya an area in control of rebel forces. the plane went down because of mechanical problems, it was not shot down. even though coalition forces have all but destroyed libyan [unintelligible] >> democracy can be imposed from the outside. it must -- cannot be imposed from the outside. it must spring from within. >> the libyan government claims forces are doing more harm to the libyan people than good. >> many civilians were killed last night so what is happening is the british government is killing more civilians to protect civilians. >> how does robert gates feel about that? >> it is almost as though some people here are taking at face the liu gaddafi's claims which are outright lies. >> a short time ago gaddafi told a crowd of reporters his resilience and not afraid of the coalition bombs. >> a former lulu lemon employee is talking to us about the bethes
is affecting a lot of california college students studying overseas. kraig debro is joining us live to tell us about an urgent memo sent to cu students in japan. >> reporter: according to csu website, they send the most students abroad than any other. we'll be hoping to talk to some officials about their bringing students home even if they are not studying near where the quake zone. chancellor charles reed says he wants all csu students studying in japan to return and he's ordering no more students go to jam japan. we were told the students would be competing for resources. and the japanese people need it more. now, this morning a friend of a csu studying in japan said she cried when she heard the news but he thinks it's for the best. >> it is pretty dangerous. i mean, they would be breathing in dangerous fumes, right? i don't think it's such a bad idea. >> reporter: reed says another reason for bringing students home are the dangers associated with the fukushima nuclear plant. tohuko university has been closed. according to the students from uc are all accounted for and there are no further
this morning. what can you tell us? >> good morning. we are seeing the storm take shape. if you're waking up in the northeast and seeing precipitation you're seeing one wave. we'll be watching now across the southeast -- it has all the ingredients for a classic nor'easter developing tonight and tomorrow. expect rain, wind, higherer elevation snows though from the poconos into new england. we have a number of winter storm warnings up into maine. winter weather advisories as well. notice who's out of it -- philadelphia, new york and boston should be mostly rain and wind. the totals anywhere from 6 to 9 inches in the hudson valley up to a foot or more in parts of interior new england. back to you. >> thanks. we'll have the rest of the forecast in a little bit. now to libya where the cia has had operatives on the ground for weeks. nbc white house correspondent chuck todd has the latest details. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, carl. here's what we know. while the cia has had operatives on the ground for weeks they have been gathering intelligence, trying to find the rebels you can work w
traffic control procedures. u.s. transportation secretary ray lahood calling for at least two air traffic controllers now to man overnight shifts. this after a controller at d.c.'s reagan national airport reportedly fell asleep and two planes couldn't get in touch with the tower after mid night just trying to land. both had to go in for a landing on their own. toes your headlines. >> five hour energy ran out and two planes had to do their own thing. >> i'm sure nothing's down there on the runway. let's cross our fingers. let's talk a little bit about what's going on right now. in libya, new video just in, one of qaddafi's bases reportedly destroyed by u.s. coalition air strikes. look at these pictures, showing a flaming wreckage overnight and qaddafi's compound in tripoli also reportedly targeted again and was struck. the commander of britain's royal air force says libya's air force no longer exists. >> so now that we also have an exclusive story that came to us, i think james rosen and jennifer griffin working on this together. essentially, there might be some break as we try to find o
>>> good morning. a responsibility to act. president obama defends his decision to involvele the u.s. military in libya but vowed our troops will not be used to overthrow moammar gadhafi by force. >> to be blunt, we went down that road in iraq. >> did the president say enough to quiet his critics? >> prince harry joins a punishing expedition to the north pole. we are with him live. >> and buried. a snow boarder crashes and becomes trapped upside down in six feet of snow. his helmet camera captured it all including a desperate call to his wife. >> i'm stuck in a tree well. give them my phone number. >> are you serious? >> i'm going to die if they don't find me. >> luckily, she did and he was finally rescued. he's sharing his story with us finally rescued. he's sharing his story with us today, tuesday, march 29, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> welcome to "today" on this tuesday morning. i'm meredith vieira. >> i'm matt lauer. president obama vowed america's role would be limited in libya last night. he told the nation we had fulfilled the pledge, we had done wha
economic toll. today the u.s. stock market closed sharply lower. japan the world's largest economy accounts for 10% of u.s. exports. >>catherine: today officials ditch to plan and try to use helicopters to pour water into a nuclear reactor. the fire is out, there is still a lot of concern that the water to boil away. here's a timeline of events of the nuclear plant that has the world on edge. the 9.0 earthquake hits off the coast friday. the nuclear plant is in one of the hardest hit areas. the quake and tsunami knocked out regular and backup cooling systems to reactors one and three. workers began injecting sea water and boron and reactors to prevent a meltdown. saturday afternoon, a hydrogen buildup leads to an explosion. blowing the roof off the no. 1 reactor building, for workers heard. midday monday, another explosion tears through the reactor number three building. the roof and topples are destroyed, 11 people hurt. late monday, reactor no. 2 loses its cooling capability. workers in jagged see water and boron into that reactor as well. tuesday morning, an explosion in its the
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